Savile Row pop-up shop to sell menswear for homelessness charity

The world centre of luxury men’s clothes will host the week of events to raise funds for Crisis

Bespoke tailoring hotspot Savile Row is sending out A Call to Garms with a pop-up shop selling luxury menswear to benefit homeless people.

In support of national homelessness charity Crisis, the store will open on December 10-15 at 31 Savile Row in Mayfair, central London. The pop-up will follow that launched by Kate Bush where remastered versions of her 40-year back catalogue will be on sale, also for Crisis.

As well as the must-visit shop, a programme of events and appearances has been arranged including a closing party headlined by David Gray.

Julian Stocks, chief executive of building owner The Pollen Estate, said: “Savile Row is the world’s finest street for bespoke tailoring and we are thrilled to be working with Tom Stubbs and Crisis on the world’s most sartorial charity pop-up.

“We believe creating great places is not just about bricks and mortar, it’s about being part of a vibrant local community that contributes to wider society. We are proud to support the UK’s leading homelessness charity.”

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There will be thirty leading international brands on offer at the A Call to Garms event, including Vivienne Westwood, Globetrotter, Grenson and Mr Porter.

Savile Rowe icons Anderson & Sheppard, Henre Poole & Co, Gieves & Hawkes and Richard James have also donated pieces of their own. Menswear stylist and writer Tom Stubbs, who brought the concept to life, said he was “so struck by the special work of Crisis”.

He added: “The pop up on Savile Row is a great way to raise awareness around the most important aspects of the work that Crisis does in their centres. For a community that often feels so isolated, just simple conversation can make all the difference. We need to learn how to engage with rough sleepers all over our city to make them feel more human again.”