Books

Sea of Tranquility review: Time travel is anything but tired in this wonderfully inventive novel

Station Eleven author Emily St John Mandel ensures the reader is always engaged and never confused in her latest book.

sea of tranquility

Image: Pixabay

Sea of Tranquility is out now (Picador)

Time travel is such a well-worn trope in speculative and science fiction because it’s a versatile device for adding narrative resonance – drawing explicit links between the past, present and future, examining paths not taken, mistakes made. The wonderfully inventive Sea of Tranquility by Canadian author Emily St John Mandel. The writer is best known for her breakthrough pandemic novel Station Eleven, recently adapted for television by HBO.  

While that eerily prescient novel was written long before our current circumstances, this book was written during the pandemic, and there are ghosts of our recent past threaded through it. The narrative switches elegantly between four timelines and very different locations. In 1912 in British Columbia, a young man experiences something he can’t explain in the woods. A century later, a musician uses footage of something similarly inexplicable at a concert. Fast forward another two centuries to 2203 and Olive Llewellyn is a famous writer touring Earth on an endless book tour, a long way from her home on one of the moon’s first colonies. And another 200 years in the future, Gaspery-Jacques Roberts is hired to investigate an anomaly in time. 

Mandel juggles all of this with a very light touch, and the reader is always engaged, never confused. The evocation of time and place is precise and seemingly effortless (although I know how much effort goes into trying to make prose seem like that). There is obviously an element of autobiography to Olive’s storyline, and Mandel is brilliant at evoking the wearying dislocation of touring, and the creeping panic as a pandemic starts to take hold. But the narrative heart of the story is Gaspery’s search to discover the truth. Is our experience real or a simulation? Can we ever really escape who we are and what we’ve done? 

As the book reaches its climax, the author weaves her stories together in a way that is genuinely impressive, subtle and nuanced, but glaringly obvious in retrospect, like all the best twists. Above all, this is a story with love and longing for connection at its heart, moving and thought-provoking in equal measure. 

Doug Johnstone is a journalist and author

You can buy Sea of Tranquility from The Big Issue shop on Bookshop.org, which helps to support The Big Issue and independent bookshops.

This article is taken from The Big Issue magazine. If you cannot reach your local vendor, you can still click HERE to subscribe to The Big Issue today or give a gift subscription to a friend or family member.You can also purchase one-off issues from The Big Issue Shop or The Big Issue app, available now from the App Store or Google Play.

Support your local Big Issue vendor

If you can’t get to your local vendor every week, subscribing directly to them online is the best way to support your vendor. Your chosen vendor will receive 50% of the profit from each copy and the rest is invested back into our work to create opportunities for people affected by poverty.
Vendor martin Hawes

Recommended for you

View all
Napalm in the Heart by Pol Guasch review – a beautiful and affecting debut novel
Books

Napalm in the Heart by Pol Guasch review – a beautiful and affecting debut novel

Half of UK adults don't read for pleasure
Reading

Half of UK adults don't read for pleasure

The Light Room by Kate Zambreno review – a staggering breadth of knowledge
Books

The Light Room by Kate Zambreno review – a staggering breadth of knowledge

Top 5 books about state control, chosen by Icelandic author Fríða Ísberg
Books

Top 5 books about state control, chosen by Icelandic author Fríða Ísberg

Most Popular

Read All
Renters pay their landlords' buy-to-let mortgages, so they should get a share of the profits
Renters: A mortgage lender's window advertising buy-to-let products
1.

Renters pay their landlords' buy-to-let mortgages, so they should get a share of the profits

Exclusive: Disabled people are 'set up to fail' by the DWP in target-driven disability benefits system, whistleblowers reveal
Pound coins on a piece of paper with disability living allowancve
2.

Exclusive: Disabled people are 'set up to fail' by the DWP in target-driven disability benefits system, whistleblowers reveal

Cost of living payment 2024: Where to get help now the scheme is over
next dwp cost of living payment 2023
3.

Cost of living payment 2024: Where to get help now the scheme is over

Strike dates 2023: From train drivers to NHS doctors, here are the dates to know
4.

Strike dates 2023: From train drivers to NHS doctors, here are the dates to know