Film

The Fabelmans, Babylon, Empire of Light: Why the spate of love letters to cinema?

Steven Spielberg, Damien Chazelle and Sam Mendes helm a trio of big new releases that hark back to a golden age of cinema

The Fabelmans

Paul Dano, Mateo Zoryan and Michelle Williams in Steven Spielberg’s autobiographical The Fabelmans. Photo: Merie Weismiller Wallace/Universal Pictures

“Movies are dreams, doll, that you never forget,” says a wide-eyed Michelle Williams as Mitzi Fabelman in Steven Spielberg’s The Fabelmans, an autobiographical drama that sees the Oscar-nominated actress play the screen version of the director’s mother. In this scene – which opens the film – mother and father (Burt, played by Paul Dano) are taking their son, Sammy (played as a kid by Mateo Zoryan and as a teen by Gabriel Labelle) to the cinema for the very first time. Terrified, the kid hesitates. “You just wait and see,” reassures his mother, right in her hunch the boy would love what was to come. 

The Fabelmans is the latest addition to the love-letter-to-cinema trope, a subgenre dedicated to often romantic, rose-tinted odes to filmmaking and the rituals of cinemagoing. Spielberg, at 76, has directed more than 30 films, many of which are now deeply embedded in our modern understanding of cinema. Think ET, Jaws, A.I. Artificial Intelligence and countless more. Although no stranger to exploring his familial dynamics onscreen (his parents’ divorce is almost a trope of its own), Spielberg comes to The Fabelmans with the lulling nostalgia of maturity, a filmmaker who understands that more lies behind than ahead. This placidity envelops the film in tangible gratitude for that day in early childhood when a boy fell in love with cinema. It is saccharine yet earnest, the culmination of a life processed through the viewfinder. 

Damien Chazelle’s Babylon, another love letter to cinema gracing screens this January, is a direct counterpoint to The Fabelmans as it comes from the mind of a director who, although lauded, has more to prove.

Chazelle, now on his fifth film, has devoted half of his filmography to the mythology of Hollywood. La La Land, his sophomore feature, took a couple through the highs and lows of chasing dreams in Los Angeles in a musical that is now burnt in cinema history thanks to the Oscar fumbling of 2017 when the director took to the stage to thank voters for his Best Picture award at the ripe age of 32, only to realise presenters Faye Dunaway and Warren Beatty had called out the wrong film. 

Highly publicised missteps take centre stage in Babylon, which chronicles the pivotal time in the 1920s when silent cinema became a memory in the wake of “talkies” arriving. It is an opulent bacchanal ruled by excess, starring arguably one of our last true movie stars, Brad Pitt, plus A-lister Margot Robbie and newcomer Diego Calva, three dreamers paving differing yet parallel paths in the city of angels. The film stretches over three long hours as it dwells on matters of pleasure and legacy, denuding the idea of cinema until it lays fully exposed, a voyeuristic approach that has critics and audiences split. 

Empire of Light
Michael Ward, Roman Hayeck-Green, Olivia Colman and Toby Jones in Sam Mendes’s Empire of Light. Photo: Courtesy of Searchlight Pictures. © 2022 20th Century Studios All Rights Reserved.

Somewhere between the nostalgic platitude of The Fabelmans and the frenzied hyperbole of Babylon lies Sam Mendes’s subdued drama Empire of Light, less a love letter to cinema than (an immensely flawed) reflection on mental health and the racial politics of ’80s Britain. Still, the film, which takes place mostly inside a regal cinema by the English coast, dedicates a chunk of its runtime to the beauty within the mechanics of projection. “That little beam of light is escape,” says one of the film’s protagonists, Stephen (Micheal Ward), his feelings echoed by the projectionist (Toby Jones), who swoons while explaining the ins and outs of turning still images into moving ones: “It creates an illusion of movement. An illusion of life.”

Why are there so many love letters to cinema being released during this awards season? The answer might be the one under our noses: it’s the result of three years of intermittent lockdowns, a time that sparked introspection while denying film aficionados the pleasure of cinema-going. It could be the product of three filmmakers at different stages of their careers reflecting on the machinery at the heart of their personal and professional lives, a passion-turned career. It could be as simple as one of those periods of odd synergy in Hollywood, when a certain theme lingers in the air. Anyhow, be it an epic or a memoir, for those who love cinema and love seeing it loved back, there is plenty on offer this month.

The Fabelmans, Babylon and Empire of Light are in cinemas from January 27, 20 and 13 respectively

Rafa Sales Ross is a Brazilian film journalist and programmer

This article is taken from The Big Issue magazine. If you cannot reach your local vendor, you can still click HERE to subscribe to The Big Issue today or give a gift subscription to a friend or family member. You can also purchase one-off issues from The Big Issue Shop or The Big Issue app, available now from the App Store or Google Play.

Support the Big Issue

For over 30 years, the Big Issue has been committed to ending poverty in the UK. In 2024, our work is needed more than ever. Find out how you can support the Big Issue today.
Vendor martin Hawes

Recommended for you

View all
Furiosa director George Miller on the function of stories and why Mad Max is a 'cautionary tale'
Furiosa
Film

Furiosa director George Miller on the function of stories and why Mad Max is a 'cautionary tale'

The Garfield Movie review – we're not feline the tubby orange tabby's full CGI makeover
Garfield in The Garfield Movie
Film

The Garfield Movie review – we're not feline the tubby orange tabby's full CGI makeover

Made in England: The Films of Powell and Pressburger – Scorsese's tribute to duo who inspired him
Martin Scorsese and Michael Powell, 1981.
Film

Made in England: The Films of Powell and Pressburger – Scorsese's tribute to duo who inspired him

Filmmaker Melanie Manchot explains how her drama Stephen can offer hope to addicts
Stephen Giddings in Stephen
Film

Filmmaker Melanie Manchot explains how her drama Stephen can offer hope to addicts

Most Popular

Read All
Renters pay their landlords' buy-to-let mortgages, so they should get a share of the profits
Renters: A mortgage lender's window advertising buy-to-let products
1.

Renters pay their landlords' buy-to-let mortgages, so they should get a share of the profits

Exclusive: Disabled people are 'set up to fail' by the DWP in target-driven disability benefits system, whistleblowers reveal
Pound coins on a piece of paper with disability living allowancve
2.

Exclusive: Disabled people are 'set up to fail' by the DWP in target-driven disability benefits system, whistleblowers reveal

Cost of living payment 2024: Where to get help now the scheme is over
next dwp cost of living payment 2023
3.

Cost of living payment 2024: Where to get help now the scheme is over

Strike dates 2023: From train drivers to NHS doctors, here are the dates to know
4.

Strike dates 2023: From train drivers to NHS doctors, here are the dates to know