Advertisement
Activism

Charity shop platform Thriftify wants to help the UK shun fast fashion

Users will be able to buy books, music, games, gifts and accessories via the platform, which boasts partnerships with a plethora of charity retailers

Charity shops are the ultimate place to bag a bargain sustainably and a new online marketplace, Thriftify, is hoping to make this easier by “connecting” well-known retailers with consumers. 

The company, which has just launched in the UK, lets shopaholics browse second-hand products online, meaning they can enjoy some retail therapy and save the planet at the same time. 

Support The Big Issue and our vendors by signing up for a subscription.

Users can buy books, music, games, gifts and accessories via the platform, which boasts partnerships with stores including Oxfam, St Vincent De Paul, Sue Ryder and Wessex Cancer Trust. 

Bosses of the social enterprise, which was founded in Ireland in 2018, said it is also integrated into eBay, Google Shopping, Facebook Marketplace and Amazon, giving charities “access to millions of shoppers across the world”. 

Announcing the UK launch, founder Rónán Ó Dálaigh said: “Fashion is the second most polluting industry after oil but thankfully, consumers are becoming aware of the damaging effects of ‘fast fashion’ on our planet and are looking for alternatives.

Advertisement
Advertisement

“Instead of buying new, we can lower our impact significantly by opting for used items, making the most of products already out there and discouraging further unnecessary manufacturing.”

Article continues below

So-called “fast fashion” outlets have been accused of not abiding by their environmental commitments in pursuit of profits while also using questionable employee practices and supply chains. 

In June 2019, MPs urged the Government to end practices by fashion producers that “trash the environment and exploit workers despite having just committed to net zero emission targets”. 

The Government insisted it would accept the committee’s recommendations, which ranged from mandatory environmental targets for high street giants and tax changes to reward responsible companies. 

Thriftify said that by using the site, shoppers could find “gems” in an eco-friendly way while also supporting good causes.

In 2020, consumers using Thriftify in Ireland saved an estimated 36,700kg of C02 from the atmosphere and 11.9 million litres of water, by buying used clothes and books instead of brand new items, the firm claimed.

Michael Mc Ilwaine, Head of Retail at Oxfam Ireland, which has partnered with Thriftify, added: “The pandemic and national lockdowns have highlighted to charity retailers the limitations of an over-reliance on brick-and-mortar outlets and the vital importance of establishing and growing an online presence. 

“By working with Thriftify, we feel confident that our business can reach customers that we simply did not before, expanding our market, unlocking potential from quality items, and bringing revenue back to the charity where it matters most.”

Advertisement

Support your local vendor

Want to buy a copy of the magazine? We have over 1,200 Big Issue vendors in the UK. Each vendor buys a copy of the mag for £1.50 and sells it for £3, keeping the difference. Visit our interactive map to find your nearest vendor and support them today!

Recommended for you

Read All
Social enterprise: the next generation shaping a better world
Sponsored content

Social enterprise: the next generation shaping a better world

Campaigners fight to remove final passengers from Jamaica deportation flight
Activism

Campaigners fight to remove final passengers from Jamaica deportation flight

‘I don’t even know what Jamaica looks like’, says man detained ahead of deportation flight
Deportations

‘I don’t even know what Jamaica looks like’, says man detained ahead of deportation flight

Tenants in a block with mushrooms growing on the walls are refusing to pay their service charge
Social housing

Tenants in a block with mushrooms growing on the walls are refusing to pay their service charge

Most Popular

Read All
The remarkable rise of Ncuti Gatwa: From sofa surfing and Sex Education to Doctor Who
1.

The remarkable rise of Ncuti Gatwa: From sofa surfing and Sex Education to Doctor Who

Boris Johnson set to scrap plan to let workers keep tips despite admitting minimum wage isn’t enough to live on
2.

Boris Johnson set to scrap plan to let workers keep tips despite admitting minimum wage isn’t enough to live on

Life On Mars sequel has ‘a lot of travelling in time and car chases’, John Simm reveals
3.

Life On Mars sequel has ‘a lot of travelling in time and car chases’, John Simm reveals

The controversial new laws rushed through by the government this week
4.

The controversial new laws rushed through by the government this week

Keep up to date with The Big Issue. The leading voice on life, politics, culture and social activism direct to your inbox.