Activism

Insulate Britain protesters face prison after fresh court summons

A second group of Insulate Britain activists are set to face a High Court hearing, and could be jailed for up to two years.

insulate britain

Insulate Britain activists gather with their friends and family before the High Court hearings on November 16. Image: Greg Barradale

A group of Insulate Britain protesters are facing jail after receiving a High Court summons for contempt of court hearings.

The fresh round of hearings comes after nine of the group’s activists were jailed earlier this month for between three and six months after breaking an injunction by blocking the M25.

The new hearings will take place on December 14 and the group of nine – which includes a vicar and a GP – faces up to two years in prison.

One defendant, Dr Ben Buse, is already serving a four month sentence after the previous hearing.

The other defendants are: Ruth Jarman, 58; Biff Whipster, 54; Diana Warner, 62; Paul Sheeky, 46; Richard Ramsden, 75; Stephen Gower, 54; Steven Pritchard, 58; and Sue Parfitt 79.

Speaking after receiving the summons, Gower said: “The government didn’t need to imprison scientists, tradespeople, teachers, pensioners; the government needs to insulate Britain’s leaky homes, to stop thousands dying every winter from fuel poverty, to end hundreds of thousands of families being cold and hungry, and to start really acting on the climate crisis now the UK’s number one public concern”.

The nine activists jailed earlier in November said in a pre-prepared statement they had been betrayed by the government.

A letter read on their behalf after the hearing said: “By imprisoning us, the government shows its cowardice. They would rather lock up pensioners than insulate their homes.

“They would rather lock up teachers than create thousands of proper jobs.”

One of the jailed activists, Emma Smart, is currently on her second week of a hunger strike. Along with prison sentences, they were each ordered to pay costs of £5,000.

Insulate Britain says a further 17 of its members expect to receive summons imminently.

Support the Big Issue

For over 30 years, the Big Issue has been committed to ending poverty in the UK. In 2024, our work is needed more than ever. Find out how you can support the Big Issue today.
Vendor martin Hawes

Recommended for you

View all
'We are here and we exist': Inside the neighbourhood offering sanctuary to queer Russians and Ukrainians
Pride

'We are here and we exist': Inside the neighbourhood offering sanctuary to queer Russians and Ukrainians

Actor Liz Carr says it hurts to hear her younger self 'wanted to die'
Liz Carr
Disability rights

Actor Liz Carr says it hurts to hear her younger self 'wanted to die'

Feeling like change in the UK isn't possible? Let these 28 purposeful campaigns prove otherwise
Activism

Feeling like change in the UK isn't possible? Let these 28 purposeful campaigns prove otherwise

Back to Black actor Eddie Marsan: 'There aren't any no-go areas in Tower Hamlets'
London

Back to Black actor Eddie Marsan: 'There aren't any no-go areas in Tower Hamlets'

Most Popular

Read All
Renters pay their landlords' buy-to-let mortgages, so they should get a share of the profits
Renters: A mortgage lender's window advertising buy-to-let products
1.

Renters pay their landlords' buy-to-let mortgages, so they should get a share of the profits

Exclusive: Disabled people are 'set up to fail' by the DWP in target-driven disability benefits system, whistleblowers reveal
Pound coins on a piece of paper with disability living allowancve
2.

Exclusive: Disabled people are 'set up to fail' by the DWP in target-driven disability benefits system, whistleblowers reveal

Cost of living payment 2024: Where to get help now the scheme is over
next dwp cost of living payment 2023
3.

Cost of living payment 2024: Where to get help now the scheme is over

Strike dates 2023: From train drivers to NHS doctors, here are the dates to know
4.

Strike dates 2023: From train drivers to NHS doctors, here are the dates to know