Housing

Homelessness in England rises yet again

Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn says the government is responsible for a ‘national disgrace’

The government may have taken measures to tackle the housing crisis in the recent Budget, but the scale of the challenge becomes more daunting with every passing month.

The latest figures show homelessness has increased once again. Councils across England accepted 15,290 individuals or families as statutorily homeless between July and September – a 6% rise on the previous quarter.

The latest government statistics also show just over 79,000 individuals or families in temporary accommodation – a staggering 65% rise since the end of 2010.

On Wednesday, Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn accused the government of presiding over “a national disgrace” when it comes to homelessness and rough sleeping.

Corbyn cited the fact they had both risen every single year since the Conservatives took power in 2010.

“When it comes to housing, this government has been an absolute disgrace,” he said.

“After seven years, more people are living on the streets, more families in temporary accommodation, more families in homes not fit for human habitation and fewer people owning their own home.”

We don’t want to see people without a roof over their head

Prime Minister Theresa May responded: “We don’t want to see people without a roof over their head. That’s why we’re committed to halving rough sleeping by 2022 and eliminating it by 2027.”

On Thursday, the High Court ruled that the Home Office was not entitled to deport rough sleepers from the European Economic Area (EAA) if they are in the UK legally.

In 2016, the Home Office said it considering sleeping on the streets was an abuse of freedom of movement principles.

The Public Interest Law Unit (PILU) and North East London Migrant Action (NELMA) had raised the case.

Photo: Matthew Woitunski, licensed under Creative Commons.

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