Opinion

How can we make politicians care about our future generations?

Ignoring the future brings the problems we have to deal with today, writes Big Issue founder John Bird.

Much like Parliament, Poussin’s A Dance to the Music of Time appears focused on movement over though. Image: Public Domain Wikipedia

Wherever I go now I am always reminded of the future. Whatever I do, I find myself thinking of future generations.

I walk incessantly when I’m in London or other cities. And I keep thinking, among other things, about a conversation I had with an MP who asked why she should support my Wellbeing of Future Generations Bill, which is passing through parliament.

“What will it do, this Future Generations Bill, for my constituent who comes to me with an incredibly pressing problem today? Will it help her?” My reply was simple: “No, it won’t.”

“So why should I help your Bill?”

“Because if your predecessors as MPs had done their job 20 years ago, she might not have a problem today. Most of what you’re doing today is making up for yesterday’s future not being worked on and supported.”

In other words, ignoring the future brings you the problems we have to deal with today.

I have become a bit of a scratched record regarding future generations, bringing most discussions back to why we need to push government into not always doing the short term, the getting by. Discussions I had with two other MPs last week were about their interests in stopping the stopgap. It was refreshing as they were in different parties, but both came back to prevention as the best way to face the future.

The story of how I got into parliament, or why I even wanted to, is pure prevention. Pure and simple ‘future generations NOW’ thinking. My mad ambition to turn government away from the short term towards a prevention-loaded future that spends our pounds wisely on stopping the stuff hitting the fan in the first instance.

My rejection and the disillusionment of being described as a ‘fine case of a person thinking outside the box’ caused me to realise that that’s because the flipping box ain’t working. And that the box is government, is parliament. Parliament, which seems increasingly to remind me of the White Rabbit running in its panic through the labyrinthine corridors of Alice in Wonderland. That yes, there is a need to keep running, keep moving, but we need also to stop and think: “Where is this getting us?”

But in my reflections I have also concluded something obvious but often missed about governments. They start off as parties aspirationally hoping to win elections, and they promise and aspire and offer blandishments that disappear soon after office is assumed.

Article continues below

Current vacancies...

Search jobs

One of the reasons for this disappearance, but not the only one, is that the winning party is like a large elephant which squeezes itself into a building whose layout is already determined, so to speak.

This is the shape of government with its silos of different departments, its inability to address our needs and problems holistically (a nice word devalued by overuse and misuse). A government unable to see that most of the problems with health and its provision are caused by social stresses which are not resolved through education, work, social care and support.

Most of the problems of poor education, crime and depression are to do with the shortfalls in social opportunity and level playing fields that many encounter when they enter life.

Last week I went to the National Gallery in Trafalgar Square and saw the Poussin exhibition. I love Poussin
and was delighted by this brilliant 17th-century painter who worked mainly in Rome, surrounded by the ruins of a civilisation long since disappeared.

I was shocked by what I saw. A whole host of paintings in the exhibition called Poussin and the Dance that seemed to underline my preoccupation with a parliament that seems intent on moving, but not on thinking. That seems intent in just making do.

This is what happens, I have to admit, when you carry concerns about the future around in your head when visiting art shows: the thinking gets into the paintings, so to speak. It happened a few weeks ago, you may recall, when I went to the Constable exhibition after my visit to COP26. I couldn’t but see the climate crisis in every painting I looked at, Constable being a painter of countryside.

There seems to be no getting away from pulling the future into today and making it the fight for life and the continuity of life in a new future that isn’t a repeat of the old, poorly put-together future we are having to put up with today. If you see what I mean.

John Bird is the founder and Editor in Chief of The Big Issue.
@johnbirdswords

This article is taken from The Big Issue magazine. If you cannot reach your local vendor, you can still click HERE to subscribe to The Big Issue today or give a gift subscription to a friend or family member. You can also purchase one-off issues from The Big Issue Shop or The Big Issue app, available now from the App Store or Google Play.

Support your local Big Issue vendor

If you can’t get to your local vendor every week, subscribing directly to them online is the best way to support your vendor. Your chosen vendor will receive 50% of the profit from each copy and the rest is invested back into our work to create opportunities for people affected by poverty.
Vendor martin Hawes

Recommended for you

View all
Labour has a chance to stop domestic abuse at its roots – here's how
A woman's hands holding a cup of tea
Caitlin McCullough

Labour has a chance to stop domestic abuse at its roots – here's how

'It was a long, dark night of the soul': What the first 24 hours in prison is really like
prison leavers
Gary Crooks

'It was a long, dark night of the soul': What the first 24 hours in prison is really like

Keir Starmer promised to tackle child poverty – but we need action, not empty words
Sanah Ahsan

Keir Starmer promised to tackle child poverty – but we need action, not empty words

Why can no government ever plan for the future?
John Bird

Why can no government ever plan for the future?

Most Popular

Read All
Renters pay their landlords' buy-to-let mortgages, so they should get a share of the profits
Renters: A mortgage lender's window advertising buy-to-let products
1.

Renters pay their landlords' buy-to-let mortgages, so they should get a share of the profits

Exclusive: Disabled people are 'set up to fail' by the DWP in target-driven disability benefits system, whistleblowers reveal
Pound coins on a piece of paper with disability living allowancve
2.

Exclusive: Disabled people are 'set up to fail' by the DWP in target-driven disability benefits system, whistleblowers reveal

Cost of living payment 2024: Where to get help now the scheme is over
next dwp cost of living payment 2023
3.

Cost of living payment 2024: Where to get help now the scheme is over

Strike dates 2023: From train drivers to NHS doctors, here are the dates to know
4.

Strike dates 2023: From train drivers to NHS doctors, here are the dates to know