Opinion

Is Rishi Sunak's anti-social behaviour plan a step too far? We asked you

We asked you what you think about Rishi Sunak's anti-social behaviour plan. Here’s what was said

Prime Minister Rishi Sunak walks with Police Officers through Chelmsford high street to highlight government policy on Anti Social Behaviour. Picture by Simon Dawson / No 10 Downing Street

Rishi Sunak’s recent anti-social behaviour action plan has stirred up a new debate around the Conservative government’s agenda. The new action plan aims to tackle drug use, fly tipping and begging as well as making it easier for landlords to evict tenants over issues like persistent noise, with an aim to “stamp out these crimes once and for all”. However experts have warned it will disproportionately target the most vulnerable of our society.

The plan also threatens an increase in the upper limit of fixed penalty notices for rough sleepers, potentially reaching up to £500 – five times the current limit. 

We asked our readers what they think about this controversial law. Here’s what they said.

“Fining, taxing, charging is utterly pointless when it comes to solving a problem in the absence of offering affordable solutions – it serves only to make money. However, in this instance, fining the homeless is hilarious, they literally have no money, the suggestion is idiocy. The government needs to tackle the cause of increased homelessness and begging and offer solutions, not penalise those with nothing. Focus on affordable housing, training that is free to skill up those out of work or homeless. Open more safe shelters and encourage them to access these spaces more.” – @capitansamp, Instagram

“How do they think someone who is sleeping rough and having to beg on the street is going to be helped by being given a financial fine?! It’s completely ridiculous. Tories are truly vile!” – @hazel_sticks, Instagram

How do £500 fines for rough sleepers work? They build up debt until imprisoned? – @housing_crisis_drawings, Instagram

Do you have a story to tell or opinions to share about this? We want to hear from you. Get in touch and tell us more.

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