Opinion

Jo Cox’s legacy has brought 18 million people together

Five years on from the murder of Jo Cox, the foundation set up in her memory is breaking down barriers.

Photos taken at the birthday memorial for Jo Cox, MP, at London's Trafalgar Square. Image: Garry KNight/Flickr

Five years ago today, on June 16 2016, Jo Cox MP was murdered in her constituency of Batley and Spen, West Yorkshire. Jo’s death was a personal tragedy for her family and caused shock and dismay across the UK and the world.

Those who were fortunate enough to know her personally were touched by her humanity, kindness, good humour and tireless energy. Those who know her only by reputation or have learned about her since her death are moved by her belief that a fairer, kinder, and more tolerant world is not just possible but achievable. In response to her murder, many people promised to do things differently. The first ever Great Get Together united the nation for three days from June 16 2017 by bringing people together with street parties, picnics, and other community events; on the anniversary of Jo’s murder. More people participated than in the Diamond Jubilee.

Since then, the Jo Cox Foundation has held four annual Great Get Togethers which have brought together 18 million people. Events have a positive impact both on the places where they are held and on the people who take part; in 2019, 71 per cent of organisers said events made them feel less lonely and the same amount felt it had united their community. In 2020, six million people took part in virtual and socially distant Get Togethers, with the majority agreeing that participating in the Great Get Together allows people of different backgrounds to get on better in their community.

jo cox
GGT 2019
The Jo Cox Foundation has held four annual Great Get Togethers which have brought together 18 million people. Image: Jo Cox Foundation

Though the UK can often feel divided, the Jo Cox Foundation’s own research shows that the UK isn’t nearly as divided as people might think. Recent findings showed a renewed sense of connection within communities at the local level. The majority of the UK population believes that people from different backgrounds get on well. Our research shows that 60 per cent of people feel they belong in their local communities. Over the past year, we have seen that in action as communities around the UK have rallied to provide help and support during the most difficult times.

With current restrictions ongoing, the Great Get Together provides an opportunity to celebrate our communities in a way that is safe and fun for everyone, and there is still plenty of scope to make new connections in whatever way you are comfortable with. It is an occasion where we can celebrate the human connections we’ve been missing over the past 16 months.

The 2021 Great Get Together takes place this weekend from 18-20 June. If you have never organised a community event before, then the Great Get Together is a great place to start. They can be large or small, within social distancing rules, and can include socially distanced street parties, online pub quizzes, community teas and sports events. The Jo Cox Foundation is offering loads of resources to help you get started.

Thousands of people are planning events this weekend. Why don’t you join them? It’s really easy to put on an event. Great Get Togethers come in all shapes and sizes, but to give you some inspiration, you could:

  • Drop a note through your neighbour’s door to see if they will join you for a driveway cuppa
  • Host a tea party in your garden and invite someone you don’t know
  • Set a time for a picnic in the park and invite parents from your child’s school
  • Invite your neighbours to watch a football game with you
  • Organise a Zoom catch-up with workmates or relatives you’ve not seen in a while

This weekend, be a part of something great. Get back together and celebrate that we have far more in common than what divides us.

Find a Great Get Together near you or organise one of your own by heading to our website here.

Jo’s legacy doesn’t end with the Great Get Together. The Jo Cox Foundation also works to alleviate abuse in public life and build the fairer world that Jo Cox believed in. Find out more about the Jo Cox Foundation by heading here.

Jo Atkins-Potts is campaigns manager for the Jo Cox Foundation.

Support the Big Issue

For over 30 years, the Big Issue has been committed to ending poverty in the UK. In 2024, our work is needed more than ever. Find out how you can support the Big Issue today.
Vendor martin Hawes

Recommended for you

View all
Prison leavers are being neglected due to lack of digital skills. It's time for change
prison
Elizabeth Anderson

Prison leavers are being neglected due to lack of digital skills. It's time for change

I fled the Taliban and crossed the Channel in a small boat. People come to England as a last resort
Habib from Afghanistan explained that people are only crossing the Channel in small boats because they're desperate
Habib

I fled the Taliban and crossed the Channel in a small boat. People come to England as a last resort

From neurodivergent meltdown to lucid thinking: Understanding the mind of someone with ADHD
ADHD brain
Robin Ince

From neurodivergent meltdown to lucid thinking: Understanding the mind of someone with ADHD

How the life-affirming power of the chicken helped me understand grief and loss
Catherine Swire

How the life-affirming power of the chicken helped me understand grief and loss

Most Popular

Read All
Renters pay their landlords' buy-to-let mortgages, so they should get a share of the profits
Renters: A mortgage lender's window advertising buy-to-let products
1.

Renters pay their landlords' buy-to-let mortgages, so they should get a share of the profits

Exclusive: Disabled people are 'set up to fail' by the DWP in target-driven disability benefits system, whistleblowers reveal
Pound coins on a piece of paper with disability living allowancve
2.

Exclusive: Disabled people are 'set up to fail' by the DWP in target-driven disability benefits system, whistleblowers reveal

Cost of living payment 2024: Where to get help now the scheme is over
next dwp cost of living payment 2023
3.

Cost of living payment 2024: Where to get help now the scheme is over

Strike dates 2023: From train drivers to NHS doctors, here are the dates to know
4.

Strike dates 2023: From train drivers to NHS doctors, here are the dates to know