Advertisement - Content continues below
Art

Jarvis Cocker interviews Jeremy Deller: “Art and culture show us at our best”

Two cultural pioneers meet in this week’s magazine as artist Jeremy Deller is in conversation with our guest editor Jarvis Cocker 

In The Big Issue this week, we hear from Turner Prize-winning artist Jeremy Deller about a new artwork, and who better to quiz him on the significance of the work than Pulp frontman Jarvis Cocker?

A cheeky yellow smiley face rises behind Stonehenge in a colourful image that now flanks two sides of Bold Tendencies, an art and music venue in Peckham. “A New Dawn” is an artwork by Jeremy Deller and Fraser Muggeridge that, for Deller, has particular significance in an era of struggling arts institutions trying to beat the odds by reopening after the lockdown.

The site for this artwork has been carefully selected. The not-for-profit arts organisation Bold Tendencies epitomises how, for Deller, “culture is the whole point of a city like London”.

The artwork itself speaks to this unique moment in time for our nation’s art and cultural institutions and what they currently face. It brings together one of Deller’s recurring symbols — the smiley face — and, despite the odds, presents an image of optimism, although Deller tells Jarvis that he’s not a natural optimist. He does, however, have faith in the smiley and in art and culture to “show us at our best”.

It’s a courageous decision to resume activities at these kinds of places in the wake of the pandemic, says Deller, but it is also so important: “the reopening of Bold Tendencies is inspirational”.

To read the full interview, pick up a copy of this week’s Big Issue from your local vendor. If you can’t reach a vendor you can also subscribe to the magazine to receive it every week either to your door or digitally.

Advertisement - Content continues below
Advertisement - Content continues below

Support your local vendor

Give your vendor a hand up and buy the magazine. Big Issue vendors are some of the most vulnerable members of our society. But, at the same time, they are micro-entrepreneurs. By supporting their business, you can help them overcome homelessness, financial instability and other social disadvantages that hold them back.

Recommended for you

Read All
Filmmaker Paul Sng: 'My new book shows diversity can make Britain stronger'
Art

Filmmaker Paul Sng: 'My new book shows diversity can make Britain stronger'

Get a limited edition print and original artwork from The Connor Brothers
Art

Get a limited edition print and original artwork from The Connor Brothers

The Connor Brothers: 'It's time to put away the bunting and get a new flag'
Art

The Connor Brothers: 'It's time to put away the bunting and get a new flag'

The London art studio offering asylum seekers and refugees freedom on a page
Art

The London art studio offering asylum seekers and refugees freedom on a page

Most Popular

Read All
More than 70 MPs back motion to stop ministers lying in parliament
1.

More than 70 MPs back motion to stop ministers lying in parliament

The Big Issue vendor who became London’s happiest bus driver is now bringing drinking water to Africa
2.

The Big Issue vendor who became London’s happiest bus driver is now bringing drinking water to Africa

Climate crisis laid bare as new map illustrates threat of rising sea levels
3.

Climate crisis laid bare as new map illustrates threat of rising sea levels

Shaun Ryder: 'It will always be one rule for them and another rule for us'
4.

Shaun Ryder: 'It will always be one rule for them and another rule for us'