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Captain Sir Tom Moore: Charity challenge launched in lockdown hero’s memory

Brits are being encouraged to take on a 100-themed challenge on what would have been the late Captain Sir Tom’s 101st birthday in May

Captain Sir Tom Moore’s fundraising efforts inspired the nation during the first coronavirus lockdown – now his family are urging Brits to carry on his legacy with the Captain Tom 100 challenge.

The then-99-year-old kicked off his fundraising efforts a year ago on Tuesday. His bid to walk 100 laps around his garden before his 100th birthday to raise cash for NHS workers touched hearts across the UK and around the world as he raised £38.9 million for the NHS Covid-19 appeal.

Brits are being tasked to follow in Captain Sir Tom’s footsteps after he lost his life to the coronavirus in February. The veteran’s family have urged Brits to take on their own 100-themed challenge on the weekend of what would have been his 101st birthday on Friday April 30. 

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“We want people to go crazy and create their own 100 – a challenge around the number 100,” Captain Sir Tom’s daughter Hannah Ingram-Moore told the BBC.

“Because he was 100 and he was so proud to be 100.

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“We thought of whether it should be 101, but it’s definitely 100 because that year he lived being 100 was the best year of his life, almost certainly.”

Speaking to The Big Issue back in November, Sir Captain Tom offered a message of hope that would go on to be his trademark. He said: “You’ve got to be optimistic. You’ve got to believe that things will get better. They certainly will.”

The Captain Tom 100 challenge is hoping to spread that message and raise funds for The Captain Tom Foundation.

This time the fundraising efforts will focus on the wider ramifications of the Covid-19 pandemic to help three charities supporting young people’s mental health: The Mix, Young Minds and Place2Be.

Participants can do anything to raise cash as long as it is themed around the number 100, for example, from walking 100 metres to baking 100 cakes or writing 100 letters.

You can donate or fundraise to join ‘Captain Tom’s Army of Hope’ on the Captain Tom Foundation website and share how you’re getting on under the #CaptainTom100 hashtag.

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