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Tyson Fury has pledged to help the homeless with Wilder fight money

The Mancunian heavyweight fighter was knocked for six when he saw the scale of the homelessness in Los Angeles ahead of Sunday’s fight

Boxer Tyson Fury has revealed that he is ready to give a heavyweight contribution to tackling homelessness in in the United Kingdom with the funds from his WBC title fight with Deontay Wilder.

The Mancunian fighter, who dubs himself the ‘Gypsy King’, is in Los Angeles preparing for his clash with Wilder, which takes place in the early hours of Sunday morning in the UK.

You think you might be in a third world country but it’s a crisis situation and something needs to be done about it

He admits that he has been shocked by the scale of homelessness in Los Angeles during the nine weeks he has spent training there.

LA has 31,516 homeless residents, according to a Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority count, and Fury, 30, has pledged to give some of his estimated £7.8 million purse from the fight to tackle the issue of homelessness back on home soil.

“When I go home I’m going to build some homes for the homeless and set up some funds for drug addicts and alcoholics,” the 30-year-old told the BBC. “I was always going to do it but being here (in California) gives me that extra push to go and do it even more.”

“It has really opened my eyes to a lot of things and I’m leaving as a better person.

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“There are a lot of homeless people on the streets here, more than I’ve ever seen ever in my life. I’m staying in downtown LA but if you go five minutes down the road there’s like –  I don’t know – thousands of homeless people.”

You think you might be in a third world country but it’s a crisis situation and something needs to be done about it.

“I’m just an outsider with an opinion but it’s a situation that is happening all over the world, especially in the UK as well,” he said.

The fight will be Fury’s third since an almost-three-year absence from the sport – and ensuing battle with his drug demons and depression – following his shock victory over heavyweight titan Wladimir Klitschko in 2015.

Image: Chris Farina/Zuma Press/PA Images

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