Employment

The future of work: Why The Big Issue has published a special edition

In the teeth of the pandemic, The Big Issue formed the Ride Out Recession Alliance to keep people in their jobs and homes. This week, we go further

1461 future of work

Everything has changed. Where we go, where we work, how we work and what jobs are available are some of the biggest post-Covid issues.

As things unlock, they are at the forefront of many minds.

In the teeth of the pandemic, The Big Issue formed the Ride Out Recession Alliance (RORA). As fears of job losses grew, we knew that would mean people would lose their homes and collapse into a cycle of poverty that could cause damage for generations.

RORA’s aim was to use the influence and smarts of many to keep those at the cliff edge from toppling over.

RORA continues to grow. Now, we’re also working with partners including Adzuna and sharing opportunities for those facing an uncertain future.

This week, we go further. We look at what the jobs market will really look like in the months and years to come. What will be the jobs that we haven’t conceived yet? Weather modification police officer, anyone?

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We consider what the change in the landscape looks like. We ask if robots take work, where will tax be drawn from. Is this finally time for Universal Basic Income?

What about access to cash? And will we all ever actually be able to retire? The Big Issue is built on the idea that work brings not just income but agency, dignity and self-respect. The question of what work means has rarely felt more vital.

You can read all our coverage here.

Support the Big Issue

For over 30 years, the Big Issue has been committed to ending poverty in the UK. In 2024, our work is needed more than ever. Find out how you can support the Big Issue today.
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