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Social Justice

Hey Girls goes back to school to train staff in fighting period stigma

The social enterprise will train staff in schools and community centres to get locals talking about periods

Period poverty social enterprise Hey Girls is gearing up to take their expertise into schools, community centres and youth clubs as part of a new training initiative.

The team will work with organisations across Scotland and northern England that provide free period products but need help kickstarting the conversation around menstruation.

Focused on “training the trainers”, the social enterprise has developed a range of specially designed teaching materials and community resources to encourage people to talk periods with confidence.

Attendees will learn how to initiate conversations about periods, how to use the Hey Girls resources, how to support vulnerable people in the community and how to demonstrate menstrual cups and cloth pads. They’ll also be updated on best practice for distributing period products locally.

The social enterprise is providing free training for schools and local authorities that already buy Hey Girls products – it’s hoped they’ll galvanise everyone from personal and social development teachers to librarians to get involved with the campaign to beat period poverty and stigma.

As well as giving the nation a period education, Hey Girls sells period products on a ‘buy one give one’ model – donating free sanitary items to those in poverty who struggle to afford them.

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Founder Celia Hodson, founder of the Big Issue Invest-backed social enterprise, said last month: “Education is so important to break down the myths and taboo that still surround periods.

“We know that schools often don’t have the time or the resources to do this properly, so they can end up with the bare minimum.”

The first Hey Girls training sessions will be held at The Gateway Centre in Perth on June 13 and One Wellwynd in Airdrie on June 18, with more locations coming soon.

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